Animal Models

Autism may be linked to abnormal immune system characteristics and novel protein fragment

Source: 
MedicalXpress
Date Published: 
January 3, 2012
Abstract: 

Immune system abnormalities that mimic those seen with autism spectrum disorders have been linked to the amyloid precursor protein (APP), reports a research team from the University of South Florida's Department of Psychiatry and the Silver Child Development Center.

Seizure Damage Reversed In Rats By Inhibitory Drug Targeting Neurologic Pathways

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
December 19, 2011
Abstract: 

About half of newborns who have seizures go on to have long-term intellectual and memory deficits and cognitive disorders such as autism, but why this occurs has been unknown. In the December 14 Journal of Neuroscience, researchers at Children's Hospital Boston detail how early-life seizures disrupt normal brain development, and show in a rat model that it might be possible to reverse this pathology by giving certain drugs soon after the seizure.

How Brain's Structure And Genes Affect Autism And Fragile X Syndrome

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
November 17, 2011
Abstract: 

Research just released shows that scientists are finding new tools to help understand neurodevelopmental disorders like autism and fragile X syndrome.

Researchers debut SHANK2 mouse, SHANK3 rat

Source: 
SFARI
Abstract: 

Researchers debut the SHANK2 mouse and SHANK3 rat at the 2011 Society for Neuroscience annual meeting. SHANK2 belongs to the same family as SHANK3, a well-established autism candidate gene.

Study In Fruit Flies Has Implications For Autism, Other Cognitive Impairment Syndromes

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
November 1, 2011
Abstract: 

Loss of FMR1 function is the most common genetic cause of autism. Understanding how this gene works is vital to finding new treatments to help Fragile X patients and others...

Common Form Of Autism Recreated In New Mouse Model

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
October 7, 2011
Abstract: 

Research team from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) has created a genetically engineered mouse with increased dosages of the Ube3 gene. And, like the patients who also harbor increased dosages of this single gene, the genetically engineered mice exhibit robust examples of all three traits considered hallmarks of autism: reduced social interaction, impaired communication and excessive repetitive behaviors. Findings provide further clues in understanding the brain defects that lead to the development of autism, and offer an important tool for future use by scientists and clinicians to test possible drug therapies.

Evidence found for the genetic basis of autism: Models of autism show that gene copy number controls

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
October 5, 2011
Abstract: 

Scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have discovered that one of the most common genetic alterations in autism -- deletion of a 27-gene cluster on chromosome 16 -- causes autism-like features. By generating mouse models of autism using a technique known as chromosome engineering, CSHL Professor Alea Mills and colleagues provide the first functional evidence that inheriting fewer copies of these genes leads to features resembling those used to diagnose children with autism.

'Autistic' mice created – and treated

Source: 
New Scientist
Date Published: 
October 3, 2011
Abstract: 

A new strain of mice engineered to lack a gene with links to autism displays many of the hallmarks of the condition. It also responds to a drug in the same way as people with autism, which might open the way to new therapies for such people.

Animal Model Research Could Lead To The Development Of Diagnostic Tests For Autism Based On Biomarkers

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
September 14, 2011
Abstract: 

The first transgenic mouse model of a rare and severe type of autism called Timothy Syndrome is improving the scientific understanding of autism spectrum disorder in general and may help researchers design more targeted interventions and treatments.

Autism-Related Study Discovers How Drug Interferes with Neuronal Cell Function

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
July 7, 2011
Abstract: 

This study examined mouse neuronal cells during pregnancy to discover how the drug actually interferes at a molecular level with prostaglandins, which are important for development and communication of cells in the brain.