Autism News

Bacterium Can Reverse Autism-Like Behaviour in Mice

Source: 
Cell
Date Published: 
December 5, 2013
Abstract: 

Caltech researchers gave probiotics to mice that had been bred to have autism-like symptoms and found promising results. After being given the probiotics, the mice were more communicative and less anxious. The treatment also reduced gastrointestinal problems in the animals that were similar to those that often accompany autism in humans.

Oxytocin Improves Brain Function in Children with Autism

Source: 
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Date Published: 
December 2, 2013
Abstract: 

A new study conducted by the Yale Child Study Center shows promising results concerning the use of the hormone oxytocin. The study found that oxytocin, given as a nasal spray,enhanced brain activity while processing social information in children with autism spectrum disorders. This means brain centers associated with reward and emotion recognition responded more during social tasks when the children in the study received oxytocin.

Sex Differences in Social Perception in Children with ASD

Source: 
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Date Published: 
December 2, 2013
Abstract: 

Autism spectrum disorder is more common in males than females. An underrepresentation of females in the ASD literature has led to limited knowledge of differences in social function across the sexes. A study on face perception has shown that despite being closely matched for symptoms, IQ, and age, the girls showed more pronounced atypical brain response, which suggests they are indeed employing compensatory strategies to look as good as they do.

See the entire article here

RNA Bits Vary in Social, Auditory Brain Areas in Autism

Source: 
Simons Foundation Autism Research Institute
Date Published: 
November 14, 2013
Abstract: 

People with autism show differences from controls in the levels of microRNAs, small noncoding bits of RNA, in the social and sound-processing parts of the brain. MicroRNAs, or miRNAs, bind to messenger RNAs, which code for protein, and flag them for degradation. Each miRNA can interfere with the production of several proteins. Of the more than 5,000 miRNAs and other small noncoding RNAs that the researchers screened, they found 3 miRNAs that are dysregulated in these regions in people with autism compared with controls.

Yale Researchers Find Genetic Links to Autism

Source: 
Cell
Date Published: 
November 21, 2013
Abstract: 

Scientists at Yale have identified which types of brain cells and regions of the brain are affected by genetic mutations linked to autism spectrum disorders. Researchers state that this new discovery has the potential for new types of autism treatments. We may not need to treat the whole brain, they say; only particular areas of the brain may be affected by autism at certain times.

College Students with Autism Often Succeed with Certain Majors

Source: 
Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative
Date Published: 
November 19, 2013
Abstract: 

Students with autism who attend community colleges — two-year local institutions —tend to succeed if they study science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM), reports a new study published October 26 in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. Students who studied STEM subjects were less likely to drop out and were twice as likely to transfer to a four-year university than their non-STEM peers.

Neurons in Brain's 'Face Recognition Center' Respond Differently in Patients With Autism

Source: 
Cedars-Sinai
Date Published: 
November 20, 2013
Abstract: 

In what are believed to be the first studies of their kind, Cedars-Sinai researchers recording the real-time firing of individual nerve cells in the brain found that a specific type of neuron in a structure called the amygdala performed differently in people who suffer from autism spectrum disorder than in those who do not. Researchers discovered that the mouth, much more than the eyes, is what people with autism focus on to decipher emotions expressed through facial expressions.

Synaesthesia is More Common in Autism

Source: 
Molecular Autism
Date Published: 
November 19, 2013
Abstract: 

New research out of the University of Cambridge and published in the journal Molecular Autism found that people with autism are more likely to have synaethesia, which involves experiencing a mixing of the senses, such as seeing colors when they hear sounds. Both autism and synaesthesia involve neural over-connectivity, perhaps the reason why synaesthesia is disproportionately common in autism.

Gender Differences in the Relationship Between Social Communication and Emotion Recognition

Source: 
Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Date Published: 
November 19, 2013
Abstract: 

In a new study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 3,666 children were assessed on their ability to correctly recognize emotions by looking at faces. Children with autistic-like social communication difficulties were compared with children without such difficulties. Autistic-like social communication difficulties were associated with poorer recognition of emotion from social motion cues in both genders, but were associated with poorer facial emotion recognition in boys only. Relatively good performance of girls on the task of facial emotion discrimination may be due to compensatory mechanisms, though more research is needed in this area.

To read the full study, click here

iPads Help Late-Speaking Children with Autism Develop Language

Source: 
Vanderbilt University
Date Published: 
November 12, 2013
Abstract: 

New research out of Vanderbilt Peabody College of education and human development found that using speech-generating devices, such as iPads, to encourage children ages 5 to 8 to develop speaking skills resulted in the subjects developing considerably more spoken words compared to other interventions. All of the children in the study learned new spoken words and several learned to produce short sentences as they moved through the training.