Autism Research

SFARI Gene

Source: 
SFARI
Date Published: 
February 21, 2013
Abstract: 

SFARI Gene is an integrated resource for the autism research community. It is a publicly available, curated, web-based, searchable database for autism research. This resource is built on information extracted from the studies on molecular genetics and biology of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The genetic information includes data from linkage and association studies, cytogenetic abnormalities, and specific mutations associated with ASD.

Sex Differences in Autism Spectrum Disorders

Source: 
Current Opinion in Neurology
Date Published: 
February 13, 2013
Abstract: 

A review of current research shows that ASD affects females less frequently than males and suggests this difference may be due to several sex-differential genetic and hormonal factors.

Prenatal Folic Acid Linked to Lower Risk of Autism

Source: 
ASF Blog
Date Published: 
February 19, 2013
Abstract: 

Read this new guest post from Theresa Waldron, author of www.healthsnark.com, on the possible link between prenatal folic acid and autism.

Parent-child Interactions in Autism: Characteristics of Play

Source: 
Autism
Date Published: 
February 4, 2013
Abstract: 

Researchers examine parent-child dyads during structured and free play and find that that joint engagement lasts longer when parents engage their child at or slightly above the child's current level of play. Parents of children with autism often find it difficult to estimate their child's level, which can result in parents engaging at too high of a level and shortening the interaction.

The Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers: Reliability in a Diverse Rural American Sample

Source: 
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Date Published: 
February 6, 2013
Abstract: 

Researchers at Virginia Tech examine M-CHAT performance in a very low socio-economic status setting and find it lacks internal consistency across ethnic and educational groups. Caregivers who reported a low maternal educational level or with minority status were more likely to mark items suggestive of autism compared to those with higher maternal education or non-minority status

Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Children With Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities: Associations With Ethnicity, Child Comorbid Symptoms, and Parental Stress

Source: 
Journal of Child Neurology
Date Published: 
January 30, 2013
Abstract: 

Families of children with ASD and other comorbid symptoms, including behavioral problems such as irritability and food allergies, were more likely to use complementary and alternative medicine, and they were more likely to use more types of modalities as compared to families of children with other developmental disabilities.

Migration and Autism Spectrum Disorder: Population-based Study

Source: 
The British Journal of Psychiatry
Date Published: 
August 2012
Abstract: 

Results of this study show that while children of migrant parents are at an increased risk of low-functioning autism, they are at a decreased risk for high-functioning autism. Researchers call for further research to determine if environmental factors associated with migration influence the development of autism.

Feeding Problems and Nutrient Intake in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Meta-analysis and Comprehensive Review of the Literature

Source: 
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Date Published: 
February 1, 2013
Abstract: 

Children with ASD experience more feeding problems compared to their typical peers, such as unusual eating patterns, food rituals and or/refusals, but are not at a greater risk for compromised growth. Researchers attribute this finding to the fact that while children with ASD tend to consume enough food to meet their gross energy needs, their diet often suffers from nutritional deficits.

Improving Socialization for High School Students with ASD by Using Their Preferred Interests

Source: 
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Date Published: 
January 30, 2013
Abstract: 

Not surprisingly, research shows that when the interests of adolescents with ASDs are incorporated into school activities, these students display higher levels of engagement and are more likely to initiate interactions with their typical peers.