Autism Science

Study of Nonverbal Autism Must Go Beyond Words, Experts Say

Source: 
Simons Foundation Autism Research Institute
Date Published: 
September 2, 2013
Abstract: 

About one fourth of people with autism are minimally verbal or nonverbal. Early intervention programs have been helping children develop language skills, but researchers say that seemingly unrelated issues such as motor skills and joint attention may hold the key to communication development.

New Blog Post: Music Therapy May Help Children with Autism

Source: 
Autism Science Foundation Blog
Date Published: 
August 30, 2013
Abstract: 

A 2004 study from the Journal of Music Therapy found that music in interventions used with children and teens with ASD can improve social behaviors, increase focus and attention, increase communication attempts (vocalizations, verbalizations, gestures, and vocabulary), reduce anxiety, and improve body awareness and coordination. Read all about it in our newest blog post written by Marcela De Vivo.

Risk of Epilepsy Linked to Age and Intelligence

Source: 
Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative
Date Published: 
August 19, 2013
Abstract: 

Children with autism who are older than 13 years and have low intelligence are at the greatest risk of having epilepsy, says one of the largest epidemiological studies on the issue to date. The presence of epilepsy among the general population is around two percent; the prevalence of epilepsy among people with autism is around thirty percent. This study breaks down occurrence of epilepsy by age, with children ages 13 to 17 having the highest prevalence.

Study Aims to Capture Autism's Transition into Adulthood

Source: 
Simons Foundation Autism Research Institute
Date Published: 
August 26, 2013
Abstract: 

For adolescents with autism or other developmental disorders, the transition to adulthood can be especially difficult. A large study in the U.K. is researching this transition period when this group is aging out of pediatric healthcare services and entering the adult system.

The Autism Science Foundation and the NIH Fund Study of Promising Treatment for Autism Subtypes

Source: 
Newswise
Date Published: 
August 26, 2013
Abstract: 

Scientists at the Seaver Autism Center at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have received grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Autism Science Foundation to study Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1), a promising treatment for subtypes of autism. Clinical Director at the Seaver Autism Center, Dr. Alex Kolevzon, says, "IGF-1 has the potential to be effective in treating Phelan-McDermid Syndrome and other types of autism spectrum disorder. We are very pleased that the NIH and the Autism Science Foundation have recognized this by providing us funding to continue our work in bringing this medication to our patients.”

Hear more from Dr. Alex Kolevzon on the ASF YouTube channel here.

FDA Warns Against Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Autism

Source: 
U.S. Food and Drug Administration
Date Published: 
August 22, 2013
Abstract: 

The FDA has issued a warning against using Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) in the treatment of autism. HBOT involves breathing oxygen in a pressurized chamber. This treatment has not been cleared by the FDA for the treatment of autism, though there are some places on the internet that falsely claim it has. The FDA urges people to work with their health care professional to determine their best choice for treatment.

Recurrence of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Full- and Half-Siblings and Trends Over Time

Source: 
JAMA Pediatrics
Abstract: 

Children who have an older sibling with autism are seven times more likely than other kids to be diagnosed with autism themselves, according to a new study from Denmark. A higher-than-average risk was also detected for children who have a half-sibling with ASD, especially if the two children had the same mother.

Preferred Play Activities of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Naturalistic Settings

Source: 
North American Journal of Medicine and Science
Date Published: 
July 25, 2013
Abstract: 

Play is important to children's development, and a new study has found the types of play that appeal most to children with ASD: play that provides strong sensory feedback, cause-and-effect results, and repetitive motions. Incorporating this type of play in recreational facilities, after-school programs, and playgrounds encourages inclusion and social interaction with peers.

Pediatrician Identification of Latino Children at Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

Source: 
Pediatrics
Date Published: 
August 19, 2013
Abstract: 

Latino children with autism are being diagnosed less often and later than non-minority children. This new study in Pediatrics shows that this may be due to a language barrier between doctors and patients, along with a lack of dissemination of culturally appropriate ASD materials to Latino families.

Autistic Kids Who Best Peers at Math Show Different Brain Organization

Source: 
Biological Psychiatry
Date Published: 
August 16, 2013
Abstract: 

Children with autism and average IQs consistently demonstrated superior math skills compared with nonautistic children in the same IQ range, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital.