Baby Sibs

Infants with Autism Smile Less at 1 Year of Age

Source: 
Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative
Date Published: 
September 12, 2014
Abstract: 

A new study reports that by the time they turn 1, infants who are later diagnosed with autism smile less often than those who do not develop the disorder. That suggests that reduced smiling may be an early risk marker for the disorder. In the study, published in the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, researchers examined 22 typically developing infants with no family history of autism and 44 infant siblings of children with the disorder. These so-called ‘baby sibs’ have an increased risk for autism. In the new study, half of the 44 baby sibs later developed autism. The results of this study are important because clinicians often struggle to identify those baby sibs who will later develop autism versus those who may display autism-like traits but won’t develop the disorder.

Autism Symptoms Change Over Time

Source: 
Simons Foundation Autism Research Institute
Abstract: 

Siblings of children with autism who are later diagnosed with the disorder themselves become more active, less adaptable and less likely to approach others over time, according to a study published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. The results reinforce the observation that autism symptoms evolve as children age, the researchers say.

Recurrence of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Full- and Half-Siblings and Trends Over Time

Source: 
JAMA Pediatrics
Abstract: 

Children who have an older sibling with autism are seven times more likely than other kids to be diagnosed with autism themselves, according to a new study from Denmark. A higher-than-average risk was also detected for children who have a half-sibling with ASD, especially if the two children had the same mother.

Differences in White Matter Fiber Tract Development Present from 6 to 24 Months in Infants with Autism.

Source: 
American Journal of Psychiatry
Date Published: 
June 2012
Abstract: 

Research suggests that aberrant development of white matter pathways may precede the manifestation of autistic symptoms in the first year of life.

Beyond Autism: A Baby Siblings Research Consortium Study of High-risk Children at Three Years of Age

Source: 
Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Date Published: 
February 8, 2013
Abstract: 

This study is the first large-scale examination of ASD behavioral characteristics and developmental functioning in high-risk (HR), non-autistic 3-year-olds with siblings on the spectrum. 79% of HR children were either no different from low-risk children (LR; no known ASD family history) with respect to ASD behavioral severity and developmental functioning, or were developmentally on target with high levels of ASD-related behaviors. 21% of HR children with no ASD diagnosis had an "early manifestation" of a broad autism phenotype: high levels of ASD-related behaviors and/or low levels of verbal and nonverbal functioning. The authors highlight the importance of developmental surveillance and intervention for this HR subset.

Object Exploration at 6 and 9 Months in Infants with and without Risk for Autism

Source: 
Autism
Date Published: 
November 22, 2012
Abstract: 

Co-authored by ASF grantee Nina Leezenbaum, this study found delayed visual and oral exploration of objects in infant siblings of children with autism that were not observed in infants with no family history.

The Development of Referential Communication and Autism Symptomatology in High-Risk Infants

Source: 
Infancy
Date Published: 
October 1, 2012
Abstract: 

This study suggests that non-verbal communication delays in infants with autistic siblings can predict later ASD symptoms.

For a Science Daily article on this paper, click here: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121001124802.htm

IACC Releases Its 2011 Summary of Advances in Autism Spectrum Disorder Research

Source: 
IACC
Date Published: 
April 2, 2012
Abstract: 

On April 2, in honor of the fifth annual World Autism Awareness Day and HHS Autism Awareness Month the IACC has released its annual list of scientific advances that represent significant progress in the field.

Autism Risk for Siblings Higher Than Expected

Source: 
New York Times - Well Blog
Date Published: 
August 16, 2011
Abstract: 

According to a recent study published in the journal of Pediatrics, the younger sibling of a child with autism has nearly 20 times greater risk of developing autism than a child in the general population.

Recurrence Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Baby Siblings Research Consortium Study

Source: 
Pediatrics, Ozonoff et al.
Date Published: 
August 2011
Year Published: 
2011

A study published August 15, 2011 in the journal Pediatrics found that infants with an older autistic sibling have a near 19 percent risk that they too will develop the disorder. The study is considered the largest autism study to follow infants for sibling recurrence.