Brain Development

Mental Maturity Scan Tracks Brain Development

Source: 
Eurek Alert
Date Published: 
September 9, 2010
Abstract: 

Researchers utilize a new methodology when looking at brain scanning data that may be able to help track and monitor developmental disorders.

Interneurons Are Not All Created Equally, Some Classes of Interneurons May Underlie Distinct Brain Disorders

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
September 8, 2010
Abstract: 

Study contests the idea that interneurons have broad, non-specific functions and argues that interneurons have well-defined properties and roles. If classified by their unique features, they may be utilized for specific forms of inhibition.

Researchers Connect APC Protein to Autism and Mental Retardation

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
August 24, 2010
Abstract: 

A clue to the causes of autism and mental retardation lies in the synapse, the tiny intercellular junction that rapidly transfers information from one neuron to the next. According to neuroscientists at Tufts University School of Medicine, with students from the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts, a protein called APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) plays a key role in synapse maturation, and APC dysfunction prevents the synapse function required for typical learning and memory.

Gene Scan Finds Link Across Array of Childhood Brain Disorder

Source: 
EurekAlert
Date Published: 
August 22, 2010
Abstract: 

Mutations in a single gene can cause several types of developmental brain abnormalities that experts have traditionally considered different disorders. With support from the National Institutes of Health, researchers found those mutations through whole exome sequencing – a new gene scanning technology that cuts the cost and time of searching for rare mutations. Whole exome sequencing can be applied to dozens of other rare genetic disorders where the culprit genes have so far evaded discovery. Such information can help couples assess the risk of passing on genetic disorders to their children. It can also offer insights into disease mechanisms and treatments.

Early Life Influences Risk for Psychiatric Disorders

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
August 18, 2010
Abstract: 

For more than a century, clinical investigators have focused on early life as a source of adult psychopathology. Although the hypothesized mechanisms have evolved, a central notion remains: early life is a period of unique sensitivity during which experience confers enduring effects.

Findings on Cell Interactions Published by U. Iowa Biologists

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
August 5, 2010
Abstract: 

Two University of Iowa biologists have published a paper on how cells make specific interactions during development -- in the hope of one day learning more about human developmental disorders.

Electrical Activity in Developing Brain Influences Choice of Neurotransmitter

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
July 28, 2010
Abstract: 

Cascades of genetic signals determine which neurotransmitter a brain cell will ultimately use to communicate with other cells. Now a pair of reports from biologists at the University of California, San Diego, have shown for the first time that electrical activity in these developing neurons can alter their chemical fate -- and change an animal's behavior -- by tweaking this genetic program.

On-Time Vaccine Receipt in First Year Does Not Adversely Affect Neuropsychological Outcomes

Source: 
Pediatrics
Date Published: 
May 24, 2010
Abstract: 

Timely vaccination during infancy has no adverse effect on neuropsychological outcomes 7 to 10 years later. These data may reassure parents who are concerned that children receive too many vaccines too soon.

Newborn Infants Learn While Asleep; Study May Lead To Later Disability Tests

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
May 19, 2010
Abstract: 

Sleeping newborns are better learners than thought, says a University of Florida researcher about a study that is the first of its type. The study could lead to identifying those at risk for developmental disorders such as autism and dyslexia.

Brain's Master Switch is Verified

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
May 9, 2010
Abstract: 

Yeon-Kyun Shin, professor of biochemistry, biophysics and molecular biology at ISU, has shown that the protein called synaptotagmin1 (Syt1) is the sole trigger for the release of neurotransmitters in the brain. Shin believes his discovery may be useful in understanding brain malfunctions such as autism, epilepsy and others.