Diagnosis

Study: Autism Can Be Diagnosed with 15 Minute Brain Scan

Source: 
Bloomberg
Date Published: 
August 10, 2010
Abstract: 

A 15-minute brain scan identified adults with autism almost as effectively as conventional methods of diagnosis that rely on interviews with patients and their families, U.K. scientists said. The scan detected more than 90 percent of the autistic patients who had been diagnosed using intelligence tests, psychiatric interviews, physical examinations and blood tests, according to a study by King’s College London researchers.

Researchers Find Predictors of Autism That Can Lead to Infant Diagnosis

Source: 
S.I. Live
Date Published: 
August 5, 2010
Abstract: 

Certain behaviors seen in infants as young as 1-month-old may be predictors of autism spectrum disorders, according to new research by scientists at the Institute for Basic Research and Developmental Disabilities, Willowbrook.

At 1 month, children with the ASD diagnosis were more likely to have asymmetrical visual tracking and arm tone deficits. By 4 months, they were more attracted to higher levels of visual stimulation, much like younger infants. Between 7 and 10 months, the children with ASD showed major declines in mental and motor performance.

Changes in Autism Spectrum Disorder Prevalance in 4 Areas in the United States

Source: 
Diability and Health Journal, Rice et al
Date Published: 
July 2010
Year Published: 
2010

Study sought to describe autism spectrum disorder (ASD) population characteristics and changes in identified prevalence across 3 time periods.  Children with a potential ASD were identified through records abstraction at multiple sources with clinician review based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-IV-TR) criteria. Multisite, population-based data from the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network were analyzed from areas of Arizona (AZ), Georgia (GA), Maryland (MD), and South Carolina (SC). Participants were 8-year-old children (born in 1992, 1994, or 1996) in 2000, 2002, or 2004 (and children born in 1988 residing in metropolitan Atlanta in 1996) who had been evaluated for a variety of developmental concerns at education and/or health sources.  There was a trend toward increase in identified ASD prevalence among 8-year-old children who met the surveillance case definition in 3 of the 4 study sites from 2000 to 2004. Some of the observed increases are due to improved ascertainment; however, a true increase in ASD symptoms cannot be ruled out. These data confirm that the prevalence of ASDs is undergoing significant change in some areas of the United States and that ASDs continue to be of urgent public health concern.

IntegraGen Announces Publication of Four Genetic Variants in Autism

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
May 14, 2010
Abstract: 

IntegraGen SA, a French biotechnology company dedicated to gene discovery, announced today the publication of the results of a collaborative study reporting the use of a combined analysis of multiple genetic variants in a genetic score to help identify individuals at high risk of developing autism.

No Link Between Childhood Infections, Autism

Source: 
Bloomberg Businessweek
Date Published: 
May 7, 2010
Abstract: 

Infections during infancy or childhood do not seem to raise the risk of autism, new research finds. The study found that children who were admitted to the hospital for an infectious disease, either bacterial or viral, were more likely to receive a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder. However, children admitted to the hospital for non-infectious diseases were also more likely to be diagnosed with autism than kids who were never hospitalized, the study found.

Extremely Preterm Children are Three Times As Likely to Have Psychiatric Disorder

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
April 25, 2010
Abstract: 

Significant advances in the neonatal intensive care have resulted in increased survival rates of children who are born at less than 26 weeks of gestation, so termed "extremely preterm children." Notably, however, improved survival rates have been accompanied by a higher risk for later cognitive, neuromotor, and sensory impairments in these children.

How, When Child Develops Autism May Determine Outcome

Source: 
US News & World Report
Date Published: 
April 23, 2010
Abstract: 

Children with autism whose social and communications skills regress around age 3 tend to have more severe autism than children who show signs of the neurodevelopmental disorder at younger ages, new research finds.

New Research Raises Hope that Autism Effects May Be Reversible

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
April 22, 2010
Abstract: 

A new study by researchers at The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences' Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology raises hope that autism may be more easily diagnosed and that its effects may be more reversible than previously thought. Researchers have identified potentially removable chemical tags (called "methyl groups") on specific genes of autistic individuals that led to gene silencing. They also observed these changes in cells derived from blood, opening the way to molecular screening for autism using a blood test.

Autism Outcomes Linked to Onset

Source: 
PsychCentral
Date Published: 
April 21, 2010
Abstract: 

A new study by the Kennedy Krieger Institute suggests that the long-term outcome of autism disorders is linked to when and how symptoms first appear. Surprisingly, researchers discovered children with early developmental warning signs may actually be at lower risk for poor outcomes than children with less delayed early development who experience a loss or plateau in skills.

New Study Of Autism Reveals a 'DNA tag' Amenable To Treatment

Source: 
EurekAlert
Date Published: 
April 8, 2010
Abstract: 

A new discovery raises hope that autism may be more easily diagnosed and that its effects may be more reversible than previously thought. In a new study appearing online in The FASEB Journal, scientists have identified a way to detect the disorder using blood and have discovered that drugs which affect the methylation state ("DNA tagging") of genes could reverse autism's effects. This type of drug is already being used in some cancer treatments.