Early Intervention

Autism Treatment in the First Year of Life: A Pilot Study of Infant Start, a Parent-Implemented Intervention for Symptomatic Infants

Source: 
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Date Published: 
September 9, 2014
Abstract: 

A new study conducted by researchers at the University of California Davis MIND Institute and published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders suggests that very early intervention can greatly reduce symptoms of autism as children age. The study looked at a 12-week treatment program with seven infants aged 9 to 15 months; researchers followed the children until they were 3 years old. Over time, these children showed fewer symptoms of autism. Although the sample size was small and it was not a randomized study, this study indicates exciting results from this type of intervention.

Motor Deficits Match Autism Severity

Source: 
Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative
Date Published: 
June 20, 2014
Abstract: 

The severity of core autism symptoms in young children goes hand in hand with the degree of the children’s difficulty with motor tasks, according to a study published in the April issue of the Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly. Early interventions, such as therapies that target social and communicative behavior, may alter autism’s course. Building strong motor skills may help children with autism develop better social and communicative skills, especially in physically demanding play, the researchers say.

For Flagging Autism Risk, Using Two Tests is Best Option

Source: 
Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative
Date Published: 
June 20, 2014
Abstract: 

The average child with autism is 18 months old before his or her parents first begin to be concerned. Given the importance of early intervention, it’s crucial that parents and doctors both catch on to the symptoms as soon as possible. A study published in European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry finds that two autism screens are better than one at identifying toddlers who need specialized clinical services. These screens, such as the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT) and the Early Screening of Autistic Traits (ESAT), are used not to diagnose autism, but rather to identify children who need more specialized attention — for example, from a child psychiatrist or a behavioral therapist.

Effectiveness of developmental screening in an urban setting

Source: 
Pediatrics
Date Published: 
January 1, 2013

The goal of this study was to determine whether developmental screening could aid identification of developmental delays, early intervention referrals, and eligibility for early intervention. The study concluded that children who received developmental screening tests were identified for developmental delays, early intervention referrals, and early intervention eligibility services in a more timely fashion than those who received only surveillance. This research supports policies that endorse developmental screening. 

Study of Nonverbal Autism Must Go Beyond Words, Experts Say

Source: 
Simons Foundation Autism Research Institute
Date Published: 
September 2, 2013
Abstract: 

About one fourth of people with autism are minimally verbal or nonverbal. Early intervention programs have been helping children develop language skills, but researchers say that seemingly unrelated issues such as motor skills and joint attention may hold the key to communication development.

Group Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Children with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders and Anxiety: A Randomized Trial

Source: 
J Child Psychol Psychiatry
Date Published: 
April, 2012
Year Published: 
2012
Abstract: 

Fifty children with high-functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and anxiety were randomized to group Cognitive Behavioral Theory (CBT) or treatment-as-usual (TAU) for 12 weeks.

Teacher-Implemented Joint Attention Intervention: Pilot Randomized Controlled Study for Preschoolers with Autism

Source: 
J Consult Clin Psychol
Date Published: 
August, 2012
Year Published: 
2012
Abstract: 

This study investigated the effectiveness of public preschool teachers implementing a validated intervention (the Joint Attention and Symbolic Play/Engagement and Regulation intervention; JASP/ER) on a core deficit of autism, initiating joint attention.

Making the Connection: Randomized Controlled Trial of Social Skills at School for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Source: 
J Child Psychol Psychiatry
Date Published: 
April, 2012
Year Published: 
2012
Abstract: 

This study compared two interventions for improving the social skills of high functioning children with autism spectrum disorders in general education classrooms. One intervention involved a peer-mediated approach (PEER) and the other involved a child-assisted approach (CHILD).

Longitudinal Follow-Up of Children with Autism Receiving Targeted Interventions on Joint Attention and Play

Source: 
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry
Date Published: 
May, 2012
Year Published: 
2012
Abstract: 

This study examines the cognitive and language outcomes of children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) over a 5-year period after receiving targeted early interventions that focused on joint attention and play skills.

A Randomized Controlled Trial of Preschool-Based Joint Attention Intervention for Children with Autism

Source: 
J Child Psychol Psychiatry
Date Published: 
January, 2012
Year Published: 
2012
Abstract: 

Assess the effects of a preschool-based Joint Attention (JA)-intervention.