Gender

A Higher Mutational Burden in Females Supports a “Female Protective Model” in Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Source: 
American Journal of Human Genetics
Date Published: 
February 27, 2014
Abstract: 

Researchers have more clues as to why more boys than girls are diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. A new study in the American Journal of Human Genetics suggests that for boys, it takes less of a genetic hit to cause autism than it does for girls. The study continues to say that when it does appear in girls, it is due to a much more severe genetic hit, usually resulting in much more severe autism symptoms.

Autism Affects Sexes Differently

Source: 
Brain
Date Published: 
June 7, 2013
Abstract: 

A Cambridge study that used brain imaging samples of individuals with autism, led by Dr. Simon Baron-Cohen, found evidence that autism affects sexes differently. The study showed that women who have the condition demonstrate “neuroanatomical masculinization”, which suggests that women with autism have more masculine brains.

Dr. Baron-Cohen argues that this study reinforces that researchers "should not blindly assume that everything found in males with autism applies to females."

News Article: http://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/Education/Universities/Autism-affects-se...

Genetic Variations in Chromosome 16 Region Affect More Males with Autism Than Females

Source: 
PLoS One
Date Published: 
April 18, 2013
Abstract: 

London study finds a higher rate of gene variations in the chromosome 16 region in males with autism compared to females.

How Autism Is Different in Girls Versus Boys

Source: 
The Wall Street Journal
Date Published: 
May 7, 2013
Abstract: 

"Why do boys get diagnosed with autism four times as often as girls? New research, including some of the latest data from the International Society for Autism Research annual conference last week, addresses this question, one of the biggest mysteries in the field."

Oxytocin and Vasopressin in Children and Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorders: Sex Differences and Associations With Symptoms

Source: 
Autism Research and Treatment
Date Published: 
February 14, 2013
Abstract: 

Following positive results of treatment studies using oxytocin (OT) and evidence of genetic variations in the OT-arginine vasopressin (AVP) pathway in individuals with ASD, a new study from UC Berkeley further examines the involvement of OT and AVP in ASD. Results suggest levels of OT in individuals with ASD may not be as low as previously believed. Moreover, the researchers found significant gender differences, including higher levels of OT in girls and higher levels of AVP in boys.

Examining and Interpreting the Female Protective Effect against Autistic Behavior

Source: 
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Date Published: 
February 19, 2013
Abstract: 

This study examined the hypothesis that a protective component of the female sex protects females from autistic behavioral impairment. The results indicate that greater familial risk may be associated with ASD in females, and males may require fewer familial risk factors to reach a similar impairment threshold. The authors hope the study will provide insight into the ASD sex ratio and aid future genetic research.

Sex Differences in Autism Spectrum Disorders

Source: 
Current Opinion in Neurology
Date Published: 
February 13, 2013
Abstract: 

A review of current research shows that ASD affects females less frequently than males and suggests this difference may be due to several sex-differential genetic and hormonal factors.

How Different Are Girls and Boys Above and Below the Diagnostic Threshold for Autism Spectrum Disorders?

Source: 
Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Date Published: 
August 2012
Abstract: 

A study finds that despite showing similar autistic traits, girls are less likely than boys to meet diagnostic criteria for ASD if no other intellectual or behavioral issues are present. The authors suggest the results might reflect biased diagnosis or better adaptation in girls.

Cognition and behavior: Fragile X Carriers Show Autism Signs

Source: 
Simons Foundation Austism Research Initiative
Date Published: 
July 27,2012
Abstract: 

According to a study published in the American Journal of Medical Genetics, Women who have a milder version of the fragile X mutation, which can lead to the full mutation in their children, have some features of autism.

Mutations in Autism Susceptibility Gene Increase Risk in Boys

Source: 
Emory University School of Medicine
Date Published: 
July 12, 2012
Abstract: 

Emory University researchers identify mutations in an autism susceptibility gene that may explain why autism spectrum disorders affect four times as many boys as girls.