Infants

Autism Treatment in the First Year of Life: A Pilot Study of Infant Start, a Parent-Implemented Intervention for Symptomatic Infants

Source: 
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Date Published: 
September 9, 2014
Abstract: 

A new study conducted by researchers at the University of California Davis MIND Institute and published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders suggests that very early intervention can greatly reduce symptoms of autism as children age. The study looked at a 12-week treatment program with seven infants aged 9 to 15 months; researchers followed the children until they were 3 years old. Over time, these children showed fewer symptoms of autism. Although the sample size was small and it was not a randomized study, this study indicates exciting results from this type of intervention.

Sticky Gaze May Be Early Autism Sign

Source: 
Simons Foundation Autism Research Institute
Date Published: 
December 20, 2013
Abstract: 

Babies later diagnosed with autism tend to stare at objects after picking them up, a behavior known as sticky gaze, at much later ages than controls do, according to a study published in Behavioral Brain Research. This delay may contribute to problems with joint attention — the tendency to seek out and follow others’ gaze — in autism, the researchers say.

Pivotal Response Treatment for Infants At-Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Pilot Study

Source: 
J Autism Dev Disord
Date Published: 
January, 2013
Year Published: 
2013
Abstract: 

In the current study, a developmental adaptation of pivotal response treatment was piloted via a brief parent training model with three infants at-risk for autism.

Excessive Cerebral Spinal Fluid and Enlarged Brain Size in Infants May Be a Potential Biomarker for Autism

Source: 
Brain: A Journal of Neurology
Date Published: 
April 29, 2013
Abstract: 

Researchers find that infants who later develop autism have more cerebral spinal fluid and larger brain sizes compared to typically developing infants. These differences could be a potential biomarker in infants for autism.

Fetal and Sociocultural Environments and Autism

Source: 
American Journal of Psychiatry
Date Published: 
April 1, 2013

Trophoblast Inclusions Are Significantly Increased in the Placentas of Children in Families at Risk for Autism

Source: 
Biological Psychiatry
Date Published: 
April 25, 2013
Abstract: 

Researchers at the Yale School of Medicine have figured out how to measure an infant's risk of developing autism by looking for abnormalities in his/her placenta at birth, allowing for earlier diagnosis and treatment for the developmental disorder.

Autism Spectrum Disorder Is Associated with Ventricular Enlargement in a Low Birth Weight Population

Source: 
Journal of Pediatrics
Date Published: 
February 13, 2013
Abstract: 

This new study in the Journal of Pediatrics links ventricular enlargement in the brains of low-birth-weight neonates to ASD.

Differences in White Matter Fiber Tract Development Present from 6 to 24 Months in Infants with Autism.

Source: 
American Journal of Psychiatry
Date Published: 
June 2012
Abstract: 

Research suggests that aberrant development of white matter pathways may precede the manifestation of autistic symptoms in the first year of life.

Changes to Children's Study Threaten its Value, Experts Say

Source: 
SFARI
Date Published: 
March 7, 2013
Abstract: 

Autism researchers and advocates are concerned about changes to the recruitment strategy of the National Children’s Study, which aims to enroll 100,000 pregnant women, monitor environmental exposures, and examine gene-environment interactions in the women and their children. The changes, which include forgoing door-to-door recruitment, may limit the generalizability of the findings.

Beyond Autism: A Baby Siblings Research Consortium Study of High-risk Children at Three Years of Age

Source: 
Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Date Published: 
February 8, 2013
Abstract: 

This study is the first large-scale examination of ASD behavioral characteristics and developmental functioning in high-risk (HR), non-autistic 3-year-olds with siblings on the spectrum. 79% of HR children were either no different from low-risk children (LR; no known ASD family history) with respect to ASD behavioral severity and developmental functioning, or were developmentally on target with high levels of ASD-related behaviors. 21% of HR children with no ASD diagnosis had an "early manifestation" of a broad autism phenotype: high levels of ASD-related behaviors and/or low levels of verbal and nonverbal functioning. The authors highlight the importance of developmental surveillance and intervention for this HR subset.