Language

Gene Discovery Supports Link Between Handedness And Language-Related Disorders

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
November 8, 2010
Abstract: 

Scientists at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, have identified a genetic variant which influences whether a person with dyslexia is more skilled with either the left or right hand. The finding identifies a novel gene for handedness and provides the first genetic evidence to support a much speculated link between handedness and a language-related disorder.

Language Delays Found in Siblings of Children with Autism

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
October 3, 2010
Abstract: 

A new study, led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, found mild traits, not strong enough to provoke a diagnosis of autism, seem to be present in the siblings of affected children at significantly higher rates than seen in the general population.

Siblings of children with autism have more frequent language delays and other subtle characteristics of the disorder than previously understood. Girls also may be mildly affected more often than recognized in the past.

Minocycline Promising in Fragile X Syndrome

Source: 
Medscape Today
Date Published: 
September 7, 2010
Abstract: 

Parents of children with fragile X syndrome report that minocycline led to positive improvements in language, attention levels and behavior. They also report experiencing adverse side effects such as mild gastrointestinal issues and some increased irritability.

Language as a Window into Sociability

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
August 13, 2010
Abstract: 

People with Williams syndrome-known for their indiscriminate friendliness and ease with strangers-process spoken language differently from people with autism spectrum disorders-characterized by social withdrawal and isolation-found researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies.

New Technology Reveals a Unique Vocal Signature in Autism

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
July 20, 2010
Abstract: 

Study reports new automated vocal analysis technology could fundamentally change the study of language development as well as the screening for autism spectrum disorders and language delay.

New Analysis Reveals Clearer Picture of Brain's Language Areas

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
May 23, 2010
Abstract: 

Language is a defining aspect of what makes us human. Although some brain regions are known to be associated with language, neuroscientists have had a surprisingly difficult time using brain imaging technology to understand exactly what these 'language areas' are doing. In a new study published in the Journal of Neurophysiology, MIT neuroscientists report on a new method to analyze brain imaging data -- one that may paint a clearer picture of how our brain produces and understands language.

Language Dysfunction in Children May Be Due to Epilectic Brain Activity

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
April 23, 2010
Abstract: 

Epileptic activity in the brain can affect language development in children, and EEG registrations should therefore be carried out more frequently on children with severe language impairment to identify more readily those who may need medical treatment, reveals a thesis from the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg.

Intensive Treatment Found To Be Highly Effective

Source: 
Newswise
Date Published: 
April 6, 2010
Abstract: 

Results of a randomized clinical trial found an innovative multi-component summer social development program to be effective in improving the social performance of children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders.

Brain Becomes Tuned to Voices and Emotional Tone of Voice During Pregnancy

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
March 24, 2010
Abstract: 

New research finds that the brains of infants as young as 7 months old demonstrate a sensitivity to the human voice and to emotions communicated through the voice that is remarkably similar to what is observed in the brains of adults.

Reading Remediation Seems to Rewire the Brain

Source: 
US News & World Report
Date Published: 
February 26, 2010
Abstract: 

Scientists studying the anatomy of children's brains during reading discovered something rather unexpected: Remedial training for poor readers results in a growth of white matter tracts in the brain, and the increase correlates with the level of improvement in sounding out words.