Mothers

Mothers of Autistic Children Earn 56% Less Income, Study Says

Source: 
CBS News
Date Published: 
March 19, 2012
Abstract: 

On average, families with a child who has autism earn 28% less than those of a child without a health limitation; nearly $18,000 less per year.

Training Parents Is Good Medicine for Children With Autism Behavior Problems, Study Suggests

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
February 24, 2012
Abstract: 

Children with autism spectrum disorders who also have serious behavioral problems responded better to medication combined with training for their parents than to treatment with medication alone, Yale researchers and their colleagues report in the February issue of Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

Both Maternal and Paternal Age Linked to Autism

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
February 10, 2012
Abstract: 

Older maternal and paternal age are jointly associated with having a child with autism, according to a recently published study led by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Dr. Eric London's Letter to the Editor of the New York Times

Source: 
New York Times
Date Published: 
January 1, 2012
Abstract: 

As a psychiatrist and the parent of an adult son with autism, I found “In Treating Disabled, Potent Drugs and Few Rules” (front page, Dec. 23) to be unfair and detrimental to the families of the developmentally disabled. Although any medication can be inappropriately administered, the wholesale denigration of psychotropic medication for this population is misplaced.

To the Editor:

As a psychiatrist and the parent of an adult son with autism, I found “In Treating Disabled, Potent Drugs and Few Rules” (front page, Dec. 23) to be unfair and detrimental to the families of the developmentally disabled. Although any medication can be inappropriately administered, the wholesale denigration of psychotropic medication for this population is misplaced.

People with autism do indeed have a brain disorder, and so using medications that treat the brain makes perfect sense. Many autistic patients have symptoms that warrant such medications for their own protection. These include behaviors like head banging, self-biting, sleeplessness and aggression.

I recently saw a patient in a developmental center who wore a helmet because of constant head-banging. When I asked what medications had been tried, staff members proudly told me that they had successfully avoided medicating this patient. But this decision came at a terrible cost to him, as his constant head-banging caused detachment of both retinas and blindness.

Articles implying that all psychotropic medications are inappropriate for this population do a terrible disservice. They make family members and staff members fearful of medications that can often make important quality-of-life improvements and, as a result, actually hurt the patients we desire to help.

ERIC LONDON
New York, Dec. 26, 2011

Warrior parents fare best in securing autism services

Source: 
LA Times
Date Published: 
December 13, 2011
Abstract: 

Public spending on children with autism in California varies greatly by race and class. A major reason: Not all families have the means to battle for coveted assistance.

Fetal Exposure to Epilepsy Drug Might Raise Autism Risk: Study

Source: 
US News & World Report
Date Published: 
December 5, 2011
Abstract: 

Children exposed to the epilepsy drug valproate have a nearly three times higher risk of having an autism spectrum disorder, new research finds.

Having A Child With Autism Linked To Genetic Variant And Autoantibodies: Finding May Lead To Screening Test

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
October 20, 2011
Abstract: 

A study by researchers at UC Davis has found that pregnant women with a particular gene variation are more likely to produce autoantibodies to the brains of their developing fetuses and that the children of these mothers are at greater risk of later being diagnosed with autism.

Researchers find autism more common with low birth weight

Source: 
Philadelphia Inquirer
Date Published: 
October 17, 2011
Abstract: 

Autism is far more common in low-birth-weight babies than the general population, researchers are reporting, a significant finding that nevertheless raises more questions than it answers and illustrates how little is known about a group of disorders that affect nearly 1 percent of American children.

Autism-Related Study Discovers How Drug Interferes with Neuronal Cell Function

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
July 7, 2011
Abstract: 

This study examined mouse neuronal cells during pregnancy to discover how the drug actually interferes at a molecular level with prostaglandins, which are important for development and communication of cells in the brain.

Residential Proximity to Freeways and Autism in the CHARGE Study

Source: 
Environ Health Perspect, Volke et al.
Date Published: 
June 2011
Year Published: 
2011

Researchers at the University of Southern California examined the association between autism and proximity of residence to freeways and major roadways during pregnancy and near the time of delivery, as a surrogate for air pollution exposure. Using the mother’s address recorded on the birth certificate and trimester-specific addresses derived from a residential history, measures of distance to freeways and major roads were calculated and logistic regression models compared residential proximity to freeways and major roads for autism cases and typically developing controls. The researchers concluded that living near a freeway was associated with autism, and examination of associations with measured air pollutants is needed.