Social Skills

Pets May Help Kids With Autism

Source: 
WebMD.com
Date Published: 
August 1,2012
Abstract: 

Researchers in France found that children with autism who became pet owners after the age of 5 performed better than children without pets on two key measures of social functioning -- offering comfort and offering to share. Having a pet from birth did not appear to influence the socialization behaviors, leading the researchers to conclude that the arrival of a pet when a child is old enough to recognize the addition may be critical.

Review from Yale Examines the Role of Biological Motion Processing in Autism

Source: 
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22682727.1
Date Published: 
May 27, 2011
Abstract: 

Review from Yale examines the role of biological motion processing in autism.

Researchers at UCLA Found that Social Skills Interventions in Teens with Autism Resulted in Significant Long-Term Improvements

Source: 
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/246528.php
Date Published: 
June 14, 2012
Abstract: 

Researchers at UCLA found that social skills interventions in teens with autism resulted in significant long-term improvements.

Study from Children's Hospital Boston Finds Atypical Processing of Emotional Faces in ASD

Source: 
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Date Published: 
June 2012
Abstract: 

New study using eye-tracking and event-related potentials from Children's Hospital Boston found that individuals with ASD showed atypical emotional face processing and reduced brain activation in response to emotions.

Vanderbilt University Study Measures Attention to Changing Facial Features in High-Risk Infants

Source: 
Autism Research
Date Published: 
June 1, 2012
Abstract: 

Study from Vanderbilt University uses eye-tracking and visual event-related potentials to measure attention to changing facial features in infants at high-risk for developing autism.

Study from University of South Australia Found that Individuals with ASD had Impairments in Face Processing and Acquiring Familiar Representations

Source: 
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22643237
Date Published: 
May 24, 2012
Abstract: 

A new study from the University of South Australia and the University of Cambridge found that individuals with ASD had impairments in processing faces and acquiring new face representations for familiarity.

Study from UCSB Examines Teaching Initiations in Social Intervention Programs for School Children with Autism

Source: 
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22645399
Date Published: 
May 29, 2012
Abstract: 

A new study from UC Santa Barbara found that teaching initiations in social intervention programs improved social engagement for school children with autism.

Many with Autism Lack Work Experience

Source: 
Chicago Sun-Times
Date Published: 
May 14, 2012
Abstract: 

One in three young adults with autism has no paid job experience, college, or technical schooling nearly seven years after high school graduation, a new study finds.

Agent Reduces Autism-like Behaviors in Mice

Source: 
NIMH
Date Published: 
April 26, 2012
Abstract: 

National Institutes of Health researchers have reversed behaviors in mice resembling two of the three core symptoms of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). An experimental compound, called GRN-529, increased social interactions and lessened repetitive self-grooming behavior in a strain of mice that normally display such autism-like behaviors, the researchers say.

New Data Show Children With Autism Bullied Three Times More Frequently Than Their Unaffected Siblings

Source: 
MarketWatch
Date Published: 
March 26, 2012
Abstract: 

Today, the Interactive Autism Network (IAN), www.ianproject.org , the nation's largest online autism research initiative and a project of the Kennedy Krieger Institute, reports preliminary results of the first national survey to examine the impact of bullying on children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The results show that 63 percent of children with ASD have been bullied at some point in their lives. These children, who are sometimes intentionally "triggered" into meltdowns or aggressive outbursts by peers, are bullied three times more frequently than their siblings who do not have ASD.