Vaccines

Prenatal and Infant Exposure to Thimerosal from Vaccines and Immunoglobulins and Risk of Autism

Source: 
Pediatrics, Price et al
Date Published: 
September 2010
Year Published: 
2010

This new study in the journal of Pediatrics indicated that there was no increased risk of Autism Spectrum Disorder associated with receipt of thimerosal-containing vaccines. The study also found no increased risk for any of the subtypes of Autism Spectrum Disorder, including ASD with regression.  In addition, it found no increased risk of Autism Spectrum Disorder associated with prenatal exposure to thimerosal.  No significant differences in exposure effects were found between boys and girls for any of the ASD outcomes; there was no evidence that higher prenatal exposure exacerbated the effects of post-natal exposure; and there was no evidence that concurrent ethylmercury exposure was associated with ASD. In addition, there was no substantive difference in the association between thimerosal exposure and risk for ASD among children with an older sibling with autism and those without an older sibling with autism.

On Time Vaccine Receipt in the First Year Does Not Adversely Affect Neuropsychological Outcomes

Source: 
Pediatrics, Smith and Woods
Date Published: 
June 2010
Year Published: 
2010

Analysis determined whether children who received recommended vaccines on time during the first year of life had different neuropsychological outcomes at 7 to 10 years of age as compared with children with delayed receipt or nonreceipt of these vaccines. Their data showed timely vaccination was associated with better performance on 12 outcomes in univariate testing and remained associated with better performance for 2 outcomes in multivariable analyses. No statistically significant differences favored delayed receipt. In secondary analyses, children with the greatest vaccine exposure during the first 7 months of life performed better than children with the least vaccine exposure on 15 outcomes in univariate testing; these differences did not persist in multivariable analyses. No statistically significant differences favored the less vaccinated children.

On-Time Vaccine Receipt in First Year Does Not Adversely Affect Neuropsychological Outcomes

Source: 
Pediatrics
Date Published: 
May 24, 2010
Abstract: 

Timely vaccination during infancy has no adverse effect on neuropsychological outcomes 7 to 10 years later. These data may reassure parents who are concerned that children receive too many vaccines too soon.

Vaccines: The Reality Behind The Debate

Source: 
Parents Magazine
Date Published: 
April 12, 2010
Abstract: 

Wary parents want to protect their child from any possible risk. It's time to inject a dose of reality into the rumor-driven debate.

Vaccine Court Ruling: Thimerosol Does Not Cause Autism

Source: 
Forbes
Date Published: 
March 15, 2010
Abstract: 

From the late 1990s to the present, scientists have looked closely at the evidence, and every well-done study has pointed to the same conclusion: thimerosal in vaccines has no link to autism. In one very large Danish study, autism rates rose after thimerosal was removed from vaccines. Another study looking at California, Sweden, and Denmark found the same thing. These results directly contradict the claim that thimerosal causes autism.

Last Friday, a special vaccine court ruled on three cases in which parents were suing on behalf of their autistic children. In each case, the parents claimed that thimerosal had caused their child’s autism. In each case, the Special Master (a judge) ruled definitively against the parents. The result was a slam-dunk win for science.

Disgraced MMR-Scare Doctor Andrew Wakfield Quits US Clinic He Founded

Source: 
Times Online
Date Published: 
February 19, 2010

Debunked

Source: 
Time
Date Published: 
February 15, 2010
Abstract: 

More than any other research, it was a study published in the British medical journal the Lancet in 1998 that helped foster the persisting notion that childhood vaccines can cause autism. On Feb. 2, that flawed study, led by gastroenterologist Dr. Andrew Wakefield, was officially retracted by the journal's editors--a serious slap and a rare move in the world of medicine. "It has become clear that several elements of the 1998 paper by Wakefield et al. are incorrect, contrary to the findings of an earlier investigation," wrote the Lancet editors in a statement issued online.

Scientist: Autism Paper Had Catastrophic Effects

Source: 
NPR
Date Published: 
February 8, 2010
Abstract: 

The prestigious British medical journal Lancet took a rare step and retracted a 1998 paper that sparked a firestorm about potential links between vaccines and autism. That paper has been a bane to Dr. Paul Offit, co-inventor of the rotavirus vaccine and chief of infectious diseases at Children's Hospital in Philadelphia. Offit tells host Guy Raz why he thinks the paper was a disaster for parents seeking answers about autism.

Hippocrates Would Puke: Doctor Hoaxed Parents into Denying Kids Vaccine

Source: 
New York Daily News
Date Published: 
February 6, 2010
Abstract: 

British physician Dr. Andrew Wakefield has been branded a primary instigator of the mania that drove parents to avoid having their children undergo routine immunizations for fear that inoculations could produce autism. It was Wakefield's article, published in 1998 in the premier British medical journal, The Lancet, that gave authority to the proposition that combined inoculations for measles, mumps and rubella were connected to childhood autism.

Time to Regroup on Autism

Source: 
CNN.com
Date Published: 
February 3, 2010
Abstract: 

Alison Singer says link between autism, vaccinations debunked but research progressing. But, she says, new science is overshadowed as some cling to discredited study. Some parents put kids in danger by still avoiding vaccines, trying dicey "therapies". New research should move forward with science as a guide.