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Using Fluorescent Proteins, Scientists Find A New Way To Light Up Living Neurons for Research.

Source: 
Neuron
Date Published: 
June 19, 2013
Abstract: 

Scientists have found a new way to light up living cells for research. Using fluorescent proteins, scientists can reveal connections between neurons in the brain.

Scientists Launch Large Brain Imaging Scan Database

Source: 
Molecular Psychiatry
Date Published: 
June 18, 2013
Abstract: 

Scientists create an accessible database of more than 1,000 brain scans of people with autism and controls. The database, called the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE), will help scientists share brain imaging data.

Seaver Autism Center Annual Conference

Oct 6 2013 8:00 am
America/New York
Start Date: 
October 6, 2013
Location: 
Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, NYC

 

17th Annual Seaver Autism Center Conference

Ichan School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital

All are invited to the 17th annual Seaver Center Advances in Autism Conference, Sunday, October 6, 2013 starting at 8am. 

The conference will be held in:
Stern Auditorium
Icahn School of Medicine
1468 Madison Avenue at 99 Street,
New York, NY 10029

The course director is Joseph Buxbaum, PhD. For more information, please contact jessica.brownfeld@mssm.edu.

 

Event Image: 

Dr. Beth Malow Wrote a Post About Sleep Issues Associated With Autism For Our Blog

Date Published: 
July 17, 2013
Abstract: 

Dr. Beth Malow of Vanderbilt University wrote a guest blog post where she discusses what we know and what we need to know about sleeping issues associated with autism.

Science and Sandwiches at Yale: Dr. Kevin Pelphrey

Oct 15 2013 5:00 pm
Oct 15 2013 7:30 pm
America/New York
Start Date: 
October 15, 2013
Location: 
Cohen Auditorium, Yale University

 

Join Dr. Kevin Pelphrey in an informal group of scientists together with parents and individuals with autism to share ideas and, of course, to eat sandwiches. From this dynamic combination, big new ideas are often born!

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Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee: Full Committee Meeting

Oct 23 2013 7:00 am
America/New York
Start Date: 
October 29, 2013
Location: 
Rockville, Maryland

Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee: Full Committee Meeting 

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

9:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Eastern

NIH Neuroscience Center

6001 Executive Boulevard

Rockville, Maryland 20892

The Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee is a Federal advisory committee that coordinates all efforts within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) concerning autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Through its inclusion of both Federal and public members, the IACC helps to ensure that a wide range of ideas and perspectives are represented and discussed in a public forum. Representatives from autism organizations with a wide range of missions and perspectives attend to collaborate their efforts and ideas. 

As this meeting is a public forum, members of the communitty are welome to attend. 

Young Children With Autism Benefit Regardless of High-Quality Treatment Model

Source: 
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Date Published: 
June 28, 2013
Abstract: 

A UNC comparative efficacy study that compared the LEAP, TEACCH and Non-Model-Specific Special Education Programs found that young children who receive high-quality early intervention benefit developmentally regardless of the treatment model used.

Increasing the Gut Bacteria In Mice That Lack Them Helps Increase Their Sociability with Familiar Mice

Source: 
Molecular Psychiatry
Date Published: 
May 21, 2013
Abstract: 

A new study finds that increasing the gut bacteria populations in mice that lack them helps to increase their sociability. The increase in sociability is mainly limited to familiar mice but the study does show support for the theory of a connection between the gut and autism in certain cases.

Problematic Antibodies Affecting Brain Development During Pregnancy Could Help Explain 1/4 of Cases of Autism

Source: 
Translational Psychiatry
Date Published: 
July 9, 2013
Abstract: 

Antibodies found almost exclusively in mothers with children who have autism have a certain anitbody that may be affecting brain development during pregnancy. The same study says that these antibodies could account for nearly 1/4 of all cases of autism.

Excessive Cerebral Spinal Fluid and Enlarged Brain Size in Infants May Be a Potential Biomarker for Autism

Source: 
Brain: A Journal of Neurology
Date Published: 
April 29, 2013
Abstract: 

Researchers find that infants who later develop autism have more cerebral spinal fluid and larger brain sizes compared to typically developing infants. These differences could be a potential biomarker in infants for autism.