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Dr. Timothy Roberts Uses Imaging to Measure Autism Treatment Response (VIDEO)

Date Published: 
October 17, 2011
Abstract: 

Dr. Timothy Roberts of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) Center for Autism Research (CAR) is using MEG technology to measure the biological response to new medical treatments in children with autism. Eventually, he says, MEG will be used to determine which children with autism are most likely to respond to a given treatment. CHOP is participating in the ongoing arboclofen trials, sponsored by Seaside Therapeutics, for children with Fragile X and is using MEG technology as a noninvasive way to measure the biological changes in the brain that result from arboclofen intervention. Dr. Roberts also explains the value of imaging for developing new autism treatments and improving existing treatments.

Institute For Basic Research in New York seeking adults with Fragile X for New Clinical Trial

Source: 
October 17, 2011
Abstract: 

The Institute for Basic Research in Staten Island is seeking adult participants for a new Fragile X treatment trial. This is a large scale trial of AFQ056 from Novartis for people aged 18-45 who have Fragile X. AFQ056 is an mGluR5 antagonist. The current study is just for adults but the next step is to extend the trial to ages 12-17. After completing the 20 week trial, participants will be offered the option of taking this medication free of charge until it comes to market.

The Institute for Basic Research in Staten Island is seeking adult participants for a new Fragile X treatment trial. 

This is a large scale trial of AFQ056 from Novartis for people aged 18-45 who have Fragile X.  AFQ056 is an mGluR5 antagonist.  The current study is just for adults but the next step is to extend the trial to ages 12-17.  After completing the 20 week trial, participants will be offered the option of taking this medication free of charge until it comes to market.

The principal investigator on this study is Dr. Angelo Porto, Dept. of Psychology, Institute for Basic Research(IBR). porto_a@medscape.com or 718-494-8028

Additional information about AFQ056 and the study can be found at fraxa.org/getInvolved_studies.aspx

Researchers find autism more common with low birth weight

Source: 
Philadelphia Inquirer
Date Published: 
October 17, 2011
Abstract: 

Autism is far more common in low-birth-weight babies than the general population, researchers are reporting, a significant finding that nevertheless raises more questions than it answers and illustrates how little is known about a group of disorders that affect nearly 1 percent of American children.

Diagnosing Autism At A Younger Age Could Lead To Earlier Interventions

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
October 16, 2011
Abstract: 

Autism is normally diagnosed between the ages of 2 and 3, but new research is finding symptoms of autism spectrum disorders in babies as young as 12 months.

IMFAR 2012 Call for Abstracts

Source: 
INSAR
Date Published: 
October 14, 2011

Illinois medical board files complaint against star autism doctor

Source: 
Chicago Tribune
Date Published: 
October 14, 2011
Abstract: 

Dr. Anjum Usman, of Naperville, has been a star in the world of alternative treatments for autism for years, but now she's facing professional discipline for her approach to the frustrating disorder.

According to the complaint, which was filed Wednesday, Usman "made statements to (the boy's) mother that the prescribed treatments had positive clinical benefits for children with autism, despite the lack of empirical research."

Boys With Autism May Grow Faster as Babies

Source: 
US News HealthDay
Date Published: 
October 7, 2011
Abstract: 

Boys with autism tend to grow faster as babies, with differences from typically developing infants seen in their head size, height and weight, a new study says. Researchers said the findings may offer new clues about the underlying mechanisms of autism. A larger head size probably means the children also have a larger brain.

The Accuracy Of Autism Diagnosis In Children With Down Syndrome Validated By New Findings

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
October 6, 2011
Abstract: 

New findings from a 16-year study confirm that the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), the gold-standard for the classification of mental health conditions, can be used to accurately identify autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in children with Down syndrome, according to research from Kennedy Krieger Institute.

Evidence found for the genetic basis of autism: Models of autism show that gene copy number controls

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
October 5, 2011
Abstract: 

Scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have discovered that one of the most common genetic alterations in autism -- deletion of a 27-gene cluster on chromosome 16 -- causes autism-like features. By generating mouse models of autism using a technique known as chromosome engineering, CSHL Professor Alea Mills and colleagues provide the first functional evidence that inheriting fewer copies of these genes leads to features resembling those used to diagnose children with autism.

President Obama Signs Combating Autism Reauthorization Act

President Obama has signed the Combating Autism Reauthorization Act of 2011. The bill extends the Combating Autism Act of 2006 for an additional three years for a total of $693 million for continued biomedical and treatment research on autism.  For each of the next three years, the bill authorizes spending levels of $ 22 million for surveillance through CDC, $48 million for early detection and treatment programs through HRSA, and $161 million for autism research at NIH.  The new law also reauthorizes the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee.