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Researchers find autism more common with low birth weight

Source: 
Philadelphia Inquirer
Date Published: 
October 17, 2011
Abstract: 

Autism is far more common in low-birth-weight babies than the general population, researchers are reporting, a significant finding that nevertheless raises more questions than it answers and illustrates how little is known about a group of disorders that affect nearly 1 percent of American children.

Diagnosing Autism At A Younger Age Could Lead To Earlier Interventions

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
October 16, 2011
Abstract: 

Autism is normally diagnosed between the ages of 2 and 3, but new research is finding symptoms of autism spectrum disorders in babies as young as 12 months.

IMFAR 2012 Call for Abstracts

Source: 
INSAR
Date Published: 
October 14, 2011

Illinois medical board files complaint against star autism doctor

Source: 
Chicago Tribune
Date Published: 
October 14, 2011
Abstract: 

Dr. Anjum Usman, of Naperville, has been a star in the world of alternative treatments for autism for years, but now she's facing professional discipline for her approach to the frustrating disorder.

According to the complaint, which was filed Wednesday, Usman "made statements to (the boy's) mother that the prescribed treatments had positive clinical benefits for children with autism, despite the lack of empirical research."

Boys With Autism May Grow Faster as Babies

Source: 
US News HealthDay
Date Published: 
October 7, 2011
Abstract: 

Boys with autism tend to grow faster as babies, with differences from typically developing infants seen in their head size, height and weight, a new study says. Researchers said the findings may offer new clues about the underlying mechanisms of autism. A larger head size probably means the children also have a larger brain.

The Accuracy Of Autism Diagnosis In Children With Down Syndrome Validated By New Findings

Source: 
Medical News Today
Date Published: 
October 6, 2011
Abstract: 

New findings from a 16-year study confirm that the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), the gold-standard for the classification of mental health conditions, can be used to accurately identify autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in children with Down syndrome, according to research from Kennedy Krieger Institute.

Evidence found for the genetic basis of autism: Models of autism show that gene copy number controls

Source: 
Science Daily
Date Published: 
October 5, 2011
Abstract: 

Scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have discovered that one of the most common genetic alterations in autism -- deletion of a 27-gene cluster on chromosome 16 -- causes autism-like features. By generating mouse models of autism using a technique known as chromosome engineering, CSHL Professor Alea Mills and colleagues provide the first functional evidence that inheriting fewer copies of these genes leads to features resembling those used to diagnose children with autism.

President Obama Signs Combating Autism Reauthorization Act

President Obama has signed the Combating Autism Reauthorization Act of 2011. The bill extends the Combating Autism Act of 2006 for an additional three years for a total of $693 million for continued biomedical and treatment research on autism.  For each of the next three years, the bill authorizes spending levels of $ 22 million for surveillance through CDC, $48 million for early detection and treatment programs through HRSA, and $161 million for autism research at NIH.  The new law also reauthorizes the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee.

ASF Expands Scientific Advisory Board: Dr. Joseph Buxbaum and Dr. Bryan King join board

Date Published: 
September 27, 2011

(September 27, 2011—New York, NY)--The Autism Science Foundation (ASF), a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting and funding autism research, today announced that two additional autism scientists had joined its Scientific Advisory Board (SAB).  The new members are Dr. Joseph Buxbaum, Director of the Seaver Autism Center and Professor at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and Dr. Bryan King, Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington and a Research Affiliate at the Center on Human Development and Disability (CHDD).

ASF’s SAB is responsible for guiding the organization’s scientific direction. SAB members also serve on the review committee for ASF’s research grants. Since its founding two years ago, ASF has distributed almost $500,000 in autism research grants and fellowships.

“Dr. Buxbaum and Dr. King are highly respected members of the autism research community and have been active in our grant review process and other science activities,” said Alison Singer, president of the Autism Science Foundation.  “We are thrilled to formally welcome them as members of our Scientific Advisory Board.”  

Current ASF Scientific Advisory Board members are: Dr. Emanuel DiCicco-Bloom (UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School); Dr. Ami Klin (Emory University); Dr. Sharon Humiston (University of Rochester); Dr. Harold Koplewicz (The Child Mind Institute); Dr. Eric London (New York Institute for Basic Research); Dr. Catherine Lord (New York Institute for Brain Development); Dr. David Mandell (University of Pennsylvania/Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia) and Dr. Matthew State (Yale Medical School).

Joseph Buxbaum, PhD is a molecular neuroscientist and Director of the Seaver Autism Center and Professor at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Dr. Buxbaum heads the Laboratory of Molecular Neuropsychiatry, which has identified genes in autism and translated them into animal models so that therapeutic approaches can be evaluated. In this context, Dr. Buxbaum and his group make use of multiple experimental systems to ultimately develop and evaluate novel therapeutics in autism spectrum conditions. Dr. Buxbaum is a lead investigator in the Autism Genome Project and is a part of the Psychiatric Genetics Consortium. Most recently, six lead investigators, including Dr. Buxbaum, initiated a large-scale next-generation sequencing project to identify additional genetic causes of autism. In addition, Dr. Buxbaum, together with fellow Autism Science Foundation SAB member Dr Matthew State, recently created the Autism Sequencing Consortium with 15 member groups to date dedicated to sharing and jointly analyzing large-scale next-generation sequencing data in autism. Dr. Buxbaum has received numerous awards for his research including recognition from the New York University Child Study Center (2004), from the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (2005 and 2010), and from the Eden Institute Foundation for his "commitment and dedication to improving the quality of life in individuals with autism" (2008).

Bryan King, MD is a Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington and Director of the Seattle Children's Autism Center. Dr. King studies psychopathology in persons with developmental disabilities, and potential treatments for persons with these conditions. His primary focus is repetitive self-injurious behavior (SIB). He has explored animal models of self-biting with the aim of better understanding the causes of SIB in persons with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and other developmental disabilities. Dr. King is currently involved in studies of the safety and effectiveness of medications to treat behavioral disturbances in persons with ASD. He is also interested in exploring better ways to collect data and to predict treatment response in clinical trials involving this population.

The Autism Science Foundation (ASF) is a 501(c) (3) public charity. Its mission is to support autism research by providing funding to scientists and organizations conducting autism research. ASF also provides information about autism to the general public and serves to increase awareness of autism spectrum disorders and the needs of individuals and families affected by autism. To learn more about the Autism Science Foundation or to make a donation visit www.autismsciencefoundation.org

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Contact Info:    

Dawn Crawford
Autism Science Foundation
dcrawford@autismsciencefoundation.org

Combating Autism Reauthorization Act (CARA) Passes in Senate; heads to President Obama's desk.

The Senate has passed the Combating Autism Reauthorization Act (CARA) and has sent it to President Barack Obama. The bill passed after Sen. Bob Menendez reached an agreement with a Republican senator who had been blocking the measure.President Obama has already made public his intention to sign the bill into law.

The passage of a three-year extension of the 2006 Combating Autism Act authorizes $231 million in funding each year for research, education and services. Without an extension, Menendez, D-N.J., said there would have been no guarantee that autism research funded by the National Institutes of Health would have continued.

Menendez said he had been trying since last week to address concerns raised by Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., who blocked passage of a bill that had cleared the Republican-led House unanimously.

In the final deal, Menendez and Coburn agreed to jointly request a Government Accountability Office report on whether there was any redundancy in federal spending on autism.

“This original legislation was a centerpiece of coordination of programs,” Menendez said after the Senate unanimously approved the bill. “It’s a big victory. I’m not fearful of a GAO report and neither is the autism community.”

If the bill had not passed, the programs authorized by the 2006 law, including a coordinating council that brings together NIH, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other groups, would have expired.

“Services that families depend upon could have been disrupted, and some might have lapsed,” Menendez said.